Deloraine to Devonport

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MOLE CREEK CAVES

Deloraine is used by many as a base from which to explore the northwestern regions of Tasmania. One such site are the Mole Creek caves. It was pouring with rain when we left Deloraine, so I was relieved we had an indoor activity to start the day. The real highlight of these caves though were the glow worms on the ceiling at the entrance to the Cathedral cave system. You are not allowed to take photos of the glow worms to avoid their being stressed by the lights; quite magical though.

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SHIEFFIELD

We drove north to Sheffield passing through more gorgeous farming land. Ever present was the sight of Mount Roland which is in the Cradle Mountain National Park.

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Sheffield is known as the town of murals. These werent used just to disguise rundown buildings, there was also a mural park where the art works are displayed for competition.

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DEVONPORT

We arrived at the northern port of Devonport just in time to visit the Bass Strait Maritime Centre before it closed for the day at 4 pm. The guide chatted with us and showed us the outfit of a deepsea diver who had to repair the undersea telegraph cable in 1879. I hope they paid him well!

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Originally it was assumed that sailing West/East across the Bass Strait would be a time-saving manoeuvre, and it took more than 1200 ship wrecks before people came to a different conclusion. There are many small islands at both end of the Bass Straits and ships tended to flounder on these. Nowadays, you can take the safer North/South route from Melbourne to Devonport, but you must be prepared to be sick! The sea is very rough here.

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Nevertheless, the sea was mesmerising and we found a sheltered spot to sit and watch a ferry depart for Melbourne. I took a photo of a white lighthouse (see below left) only to discover it had red stripes on the other side (see below right).

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© Helen Gray 2020